Preparing Pets for Boarding and Kenneling

doc-picSummer vacations are quickly approaching, which means many pet owners may be traveling to visit friends and family. With all the hustle and bustle of travel plans being made it’s easy to forget about the necessary preparations and plans for Fido and Fluffy! Whether you will be kenneling Fido or bringing Fluffy along for the trip, Allentown Animal Clinic has the info on what you’ll need to know!

If you are kenneling your pet avoid the seasonal rush and be sure you have the following done a few weeks before you are set to travel.

  • Visit the kennel before you drop off your pet. Most kennels welcome visits and it gives you a chance to ask any questions about the facility.
  • If your pet is on medication, be sure you have enough to last through his/her entire stay. Also, you want to be sure the kennel staff can administer it properly. Some kennels, especially during peak seasons, may not be able to give medication as often as your pet requires.
  • Most kennels will require a health certificate and a copy of your pet’s most recent vaccines.  Kennels can have different vaccine requirements as well, don’t just assume your pet has everything the kennel will require. Find out from the kennel what is required. Now is a good time to call your vet and be sure all required vaccines are up to date!
  • If your pet has fleas, or other parasites, he/she should be treated prior to arrival at the kennel.

If you will be taking a road trip with your pet it will be a lot less stressful for them (and YOU!) if you make the necessary preparations well in advance.

  • If your pet is not accustomed to being in the car, it’s up to you to change that prior to travel. Get your pet used to being in a carrier or a pet seat belt. It’s never safe to have a loose pet in the car. Start taking short trips to the park or grocery store before hitting the open road with your pet in tow.
  • Don’t let your dog hang his/her head out the window. Debris from the road can hit your dog, causing possible injury and/or ear and eye infections.
  • Take frequent breaks!
  • Some pets do get carsick. Ask your veterinarian about appropriate medication and dosage before you leave.
  • Bring along a health certificate and vaccination records. Also, be sure your pet is wearing a collar and ID tags!
  • Prepare an emergency medical kit. A familiar toy or blanket may also be useful.

Preparing your Pets for Boarding and Traveling

Summer vacations are quickly approaching, which means many pet owners may be traveling to visit friends and family. With all the hustle and bustle of travel plans being made it’s easy to forget about the necessary preparations and plans for Fido and Fluffy! Whether you will be kenneling Fido or bringing Fluffy along for the trip, Allentown Animal Clinic has the info on what you’ll need to know!

If you are kenneling your pet avoid the seasonal rush and be sure you have the following done a few weeks before you are set to travel.

  • Visit the kennel before you drop off your pet. Most kennels welcome visits and it gives you a chance to ask any questions about the facility.
  • If your pet is on medication, be sure you have enough to last through his/her entire stay. Also, you want to be sure the kennel staff can administer it properly. Some kennels, especially during peak seasons, may not be able to give medication as often as your pet requires.
  • Most kennels will require a health certificate and a copy of your pet’s most recent vaccines.  Kennels can have different vaccine requirements as well, don’t just assume your pet has everything the kennel will require. Find out from the kennel what is required. Now is a good time to call your vet and be sure all required vaccines are up to date!
  • If your pet has fleas, or other parasites, he/she should be treated prior to arrival at the kennel.

If you will be taking a road trip with your pet it will be a lot less stressful for them (and YOU!) if you make the necessary preparations well in advance.

  • If your pet is not accustomed to being in the car, it’s up to you to change that prior to travel. Get your pet used to being in a carrier or a pet seat belt. It’s never safe to have a loose pet in the car. Start taking short trips to the park or grocery store before hitting the open road with your pet in tow.
  • Don’t let your dog hang his/her head out the window. Debris from the road can hit your dog, causing possible injury and/or ear and eye infections.
  • Take frequent breaks!
  • Some pets do get carsick. Ask your veterinarian about appropriate medication and dosage before you leave.
  • Bring along a health certificate and vaccination records. Also, be sure your pet is wearing a collar and ID tags!
  • Prepare an emergency medical kit. A familiar toy or blanket may also be useful.

Flea Prevention and Control

With Spring just around the corner and the warm temperatures we’ve been experiencing this past winter flea prevention and control are something pet owner’s need to be thinking about now to avoid fighting a losing battle come mid- to late summer.

With new product innovations and insight into flea biology pet owners can avoid severe infestations by taking action before fleas are abundant. The majority of the adult flea’s life is spent on the pet, not in the carpet. The adult fleas lay their eggs on the pet’s fur and those eggs fall onto the carpeting, under furniture, and anywhere the pet lays. To prevent future generations pet owners can break the cycle of flea development by killing the eggs or by eliminating the egg-laying adults.

Several products have become available that are convenient, affordable, and effective.

Topical Spot-On Treatments (Frontline Plus, K9 Advantix): A convenient product which involves applying a few drops of medication between the shoulder blades of the animal. Frontline Plus kills 98-100% of adult fleas within 24 hours and contains an added ingredient that kills flea eggs and larvae. This makes it one of the most complete of the spot treatments.

Oral Pill (Program, Capstar): Oral pills render the flea eggs sterile and prevent them from hatching when administered once a month.

Premise Treatment (KnockOut Spray): Products that will be the most effective include an ingredient effective against adult fleas as well as an insect growth regulator which provides long term suppression.

When treating the indoor premises remember to:

Remove pet food/water dishes, cover fish tanks, and disconnect their aerators.

Wash or destroy all pet bedding.

VACUUM! Vacuuming removes many of the eggs, larvae, and pupae developing within the home.

By initiating treatment now you will greatly reduce the potential for an infestation later in the season.

Talk to your veterinarian about which options may be best for you and your pets!